Asconius Commentaries on Five Speeches of Cicero


Book Description

Students and scholars of Latin, history, and literature will find this to be an outstanding book that offers insights into the lives of Cicero and Asconius, as well as a fascinating look at Rome in the first century B.C. Commentaries by Asconius are included with the text and translation of these speeches by Cicero: In Pisonem, Pro Scauro, Pro Milone, Pro Cornelio, and In Toga Candida.




Asconius


Book Description

Asconius lived about a century after Cicero and wrote commentaries on Cicero's speeches to help his sons understand them. Five of these have survived. They are not only interesting in their own right but also provide a mine of information about the turbulent history of the Ciceronian age. Consequently they are studied by all those who work on the history of the final years of the Roman Republic. This volume brings together the original Latin text with a new translation and commentary, designed for students, as well as indices, a glossary, and a full bibliography.




Asconius


Book Description

...a work of considerable utility and as such represents a fitting memorial to an under-rated scholar. - A. Keaveney, Les --Eacute--;tudes Classiques, 75,3




Commentaries on Speeches of Cicero


Book Description

Asconius lived about a century after Cicero and wrote commentaries on Cicero's speeches to help his sons understand them. Five of these have survived. They are not only interesting in their own right but also provide a mine of information about the turbulent history of the Ciceronian age. Consequently they are studied by all those who work on the history of the final years of the Roman Republic. This volume brings together the original Latin text with a new translation and commentary, designed for students, as well as indices, a glossary, and a full bibliography.




The Scholia on Cicero's Speeches


Book Description

This volume, the first one dedicated to the ancient scholia to Cicero's speeches, analyzes them from different angles and positions them in the broader context of late antique commentaries and learning.




Cicero's Consulship Campaign


Book Description

This volume in the LACTOR Sourcebooks in Ancient History series features primary texts relating to Cicero's campaign for the consulship of 63 BC, with an accompanying glossary and timeline. It provides for the needs of students at schools and universities who are studying ancient history in English translation and has been written and reviewed by experienced teachers. The texts selected include two letters to Atticus, extracts from two speeches and Asconius' commentary on Cicero's speech as a candidate, and 'A Short Guide to Electioneering' attributed to Quintus Cicero.




Defence Speeches


Book Description

This book presents five of Cicero's courtroom defences, including the defence of Roscius, falsely accused of murdering his father; of the consul-elect Murena, accused of electoral bribery; and of Milo, for murdering Cicero's enemy Clodius.




Paul as homo novus


Book Description

20ths century research in St. Paul is widely impacted by Adolf Deissmann's prominent view on the apostle as a "homo novus" (1911). But where does this concept originate from, and what does it imply? This collection of articles does not only re-evaluate Deissmann's concept by tracing it back to its historical and socio-political origins in Cicero and exploring how authors from (early) Imperial Time perceive and transform the homo novus paradigm by diverse modes and strategies of literary self-fashioning. Scholars ranging the fields of New Testament Studies, Greek and Latin Philology, Ancient History, Patristics, and Comparative Literature also examine how the Ciceronian paradigm was early on transformed, disseminated, and applied as a literary concept and an authorial topos of self-molding. One of the leading questions throughout the volume thus is: How do authors like Cicero, Horace, Paul, Tacitus, Seneca, Athanasius, and Augustine fashion themselves in accordance to or in difference from the idea of being a "new man"? It is argued that by means of literary self-configuration, indeed, some of these writers – such as Paul and Augustine – want to appear as "new men" by either altering traditional social, moral, religious, or political roles, or by creating new patterns of social behavior and religious self-understanding.




Philodemus and the New Testament World


Book Description

The fifteen essays in this volume, rooted in the work of the Hellenistic Moral Philosophy and Early Christianity Section of the SBL, examine the works of the Epicurean philosopher Philodemus and how they illuminate the cultural context of early Christianity.




A History of Renaissance Rhetoric 1380-1620


Book Description

This is the first comprehensive History of Renaissance Rhetoric. Rhetoric, a training in writing and delivering speeches, was a fundamental part of renaissance culture and education. It is concerned with a wide range of issues, connected with style, argument, self-presentation, the arousal of emotion, voice and gesture. More than 3,500 works on rhetoric were published in a total of over 15,000 editions between 1460 and 1700. The renaissance was a great age of innovation in rhetorical theory. This book shows how renaissance scholars recovered and circulated classical rhetoric texts, how they absorbed new doctrines from Greek rhetoric, and how they adapted classical rhetorical teaching to fit modern conditions. It traces the development of specialised manuals in letter-writing, sermon composition and style, alongside accounts of the major Latin treatises in the field by Lorenzo Valla, George Trapezuntius, Rudolph Agricola, Erasmus, Philip Melanchthon, Johann Sturm, Juan Luis Vives, Peter Ramus, Cyprien Soarez, Justus Lipsius, Gerard Vossius and many others.